Home  > NEWS  >  5 health benefits of sex toys

5 health benefits of sex toys

2020-08-03

5 health benefits of sex toys
According to this former nurse, sex toys should be prescribed by doctors. We're all for it!
By Natalie Healey


1.Great sex is good for you
One area sex toys can help with is simply making sex more enjoyable, helping couples discover what turns them on.

'Having great sex can promote health and wellbeing by improving your mood and physically making you feel good. Using a sex toy can spice up a flagging sex life and bring a bit of fun into your life. A sex toy will make you feel great as well as promoting your circulation and the release of the "feel good factors" during an orgasm.'

2. Sex toys can rejuvenate vaginas
Some of the most uncomfortable symptoms of the menopause are gynaecological. Declining levels of the hormone oestrogen can lead to vaginal tightness, dryness and atrophy. This can lead to painful sex and decreased sex drive.

3. Sex toys help men too
Men can benefit from toys too, says Evans. She says men who use them are less likely to be burdened with erectile dysfunction, difficulty orgasming and low sex drive.

'They are also more likely to be aware of their sexual health, making them more likely to notice any abnormalities and seek medical advice,' she points out.

4. Sex isn't just about penetration
There's a reason sexperts stress the importance of foreplay. Most women just cannot orgasm through penetration alone no matter how turned on they are. Stimulating the clitoris can be the key to satisfying climaxes and sex toys can make that easier. Vibrators can be really useful for vulval pain conditions such as vulvodynia where penetration can be tricky to achieve.


5. Vibrators can be better than medical dilators for vaginismus
Vaginismus, a condition in which a woman's vaginal muscles tense up involuntarily, when penetration is attempted is generally treated using medical dilators of increasing sizes to allow the patient to begin with the thinnest dilator and slowly progress to the next size. But not all women get on with these, reveals Evans.

Women's health physiotherapist Michelle Lyons says she often tries to get her sexual health patients to use a vibrator instead of a standard dilator. 

'They hopefully already associate the vibrator with pleasure, which can be a significant help with their recovery from vaginismus/dyspareunia. We know from the research that low frequency vibrations can be sedative for the pelvic floor muscles, whereas higher frequencies are more stimulating. After all, the goal of my sexual rehab clients is to return to sexual pleasure, not just to 'tolerate' the presence of something in their vagina!'




Chat Online 编辑模式下无法使用
Chat Online inputting...